Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Pirating About In Small Boats

If you are going to be pirating about in your petit bateau, your going to need some Captain's gear. Check out Pirating About for beads, bandanas, frock coats, shirts and sashes. Made for pirates by pirates.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

Super Sailfish MKII Handrails

We ran across someone looking for a handrail for their Super Sailfish MKII, the fiberglass version of the 13'7" wooden Super Sailfish. The handrails are a pretty important part of this boardboat, as there is not much to hold onto while sailing. Here are the rails on our SS MKII.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

Most likely there are not a lot of spare Super Sailfish handrails laying around, so I offered to make a replacement. We measured the rail at 3/4 inches thickness, 41 inches long and 1 5/8 inches tall. Most likely the originals were mahogany, for this project I chose red oak, because that's what Lowes had in stock, ready to buy. I forgot to measure the height before I went to Lowes, so I guessed, as it turns out I can cut 2 rails from this 48 inch section that is "4" inches wide (actually measures 3 1/2"). There are host of other woods that could be used, in the future we might make a few from cypress or ash.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

For this rail I took the oak out to our SS MKII and traced the profile with pencil onto the wood. Then I came inside and checked some basic dimensions with a caliper, like how wide the screw bases were, how high the rail stood and how tall the cutout areas were. The pencil tracing was off a little along the top, so I marked off 1 5/8 inches then redrew a straight line using a straight piece of wood as a guide.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

I cut out the entire piece using a jigsaw. Next time I will use a table saw to cut the straight part of the top edge, that will make a straighter line. Remember your goggles and hearing protection.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

Sanded the edges with a rando orbital sander, 120 grit to give them a nice smooth feel. Our edges are not as rounded as the 50 year old original, we left some room for them to age :) While I was sanding I decided to refinish the rails ou our SS MKII, they were pretty crunchy.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

We used our rail as a template on where to drill the holes. When I drilled the holes, I put a scrap piece of oak under the new rail so that the drill bit would not blow out (tear out) the back side of the hole, couldn't show that here because I only had two hands. You can see the crusty patina on Sweetness' old handrail.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

The original rails used a #10 bronze screw that was countersunk. I copied that with a 3/8 inch bit for the head of the screw and 5/32 inch bit for the threads. Next time I'll use a drill press, it was hard to control the exact depth I wanted by hand. Or skip the countersink. After holes were drilled we applied a coat of Minwax clear Polycrylic, it will protect the wood and let the grain show through. Polycrylic is water based and very easy to clean up.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

The new handrail has shipped, and Sweetness has newly varnished handrails.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

If you'd like to order a new handrail, click on the Paypal Buy Now link below.


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Tuesday, September 17, 2013

ODay Daysailer Trailer Guides

The flat hull on the Daysailer makes it tricky to get back on the trailer, so we added some trailer guides to assist. Our local trailer manufacturer Eddie English in Milton, FL sells a nice trailer guide kit that comes with trailer brackets, steel guide posts and PVC rollers.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

The guide brackets bolt onto the trailer frame. In order to get the right size guide it is important to know the size of your frame, the width of the frame and the beam of the boat.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

The guide bolts into the frame and the PVC roller fits over the guide. These guides are pretty tall, but now I can see where the trailer is when backing up without the boat loaded. Before it was too low to see.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

Monday, September 16, 2013

Drascombe Lugger Rigging

We keep all of the sailing gear in the boat when it is stored in the garage. Some items get moved to the van when taking off for a road trip. Today we rigged in the driveway and launched from the neighbor's ramp.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

All our kids outgrew this life jacket so now it pulls duty as a road trip cushion for the main and mizzen, lashed down with one of the dock lines around the starboard stern cleat and traveller. We fly a couple of pennants, so now is the time to ship those.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

The main is stowed in a side locker, the rudder and the motor ride on the cockpit sole, rudder is cushioned by an old towel.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

Here is the rigging for the mainsheet.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

The bumpkin gets shipped through the transom, sheet is clipped to the sail and bitter end led through hole in transom to jam cleat. We leave it retracted in case we spin the boat around at the dock, that prevents it from getting snapped off. We also drop in an electric motor, used to maneuver to and from the dock if wind conditions are not conducive to sailing to and from.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

We use one of our throwable cushions to protect the mast for trailering. It is secured with the dock line around the belaying pins.

We placed a silver dime at the base of the mast as a gift to the wind gods.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

When I rig the boat single handed, I step the mizzen first to get it out of the way and then step the mast. You have to raise the gaff a little and make sure all the parall beads and rigging clear the thwart. Once the mast is up, I lash the base around the belaying pins with a sail tie to hold it in place while I secure the jib.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

The jib connects to the furling drum, it is a job that requires 2 1/2 hands. The easy way is one person pushing the mast forward a little and holding out the jib while a second person pins the shackle into the furling drum. The cotter pin also has a retaining clip.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

The side stays are secured by taking a few turns through the fairleads in the cockpit and then throwing on a few half hitches.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

Once the main mast is secure we like to raise the main without it being sheeted and get the halyard and downhaul sorted out. Then we lower the main, clip the clew to the sheet and stow it on the cockpit sole on the side farthest away from the dock. That way when we step in the boat from the dock we are not stepping on the sail.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

OnKaHyE rigged and ready for the ramp.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

Dropped the boat in, Skipper also handles Dock Wench duties, she keeps the boat calm while I get the trailer out of the water. Don't forget the drain plug!

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

Once in the water in the dock, we drop a little centerboard, put the motor down and ship the bumpkin. We motor out a bit and drop in the rudder, raise the sails and go for a cruise.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

OnKaHyE and Cyane taking a break.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

Monday, September 9, 2013

Sunfish/Sailfish Mast Base Cap

The Sunfish and Sailfish masts have plastic cap on the base that keeps the aluminum from grinding through the hull.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

If the cap will not go in easily, you can sand a little around the edge to get it started.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

Once you get the cap started into the mast you can tap it in with a hammer or drop the mast onto a hard surface to seat it.



There is a small pin that can be inserted through the side of the mast to hold the cap in place, but when it fits this tight it is not needed.

The Sunfish, Super Sailfish and Super Sailfish MKII use the same size mast. These are the mast for Sweetness and Zsa Zsa.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

DePersia Bailer

I bought a DePersia bailer for the wooden Sunfish Chip.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

The bailer has the standard nylon ball that will float up when the boat is not moving and seal the bailer hole.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

The bailer has a screw cap that can be opened and closed to let water out of the boat.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

This is the bailer for our 1953 Sunfish :)

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

Super Sailfish MKII Handrail and Drain Plug

The Super Sailfish MKII handrails were missing a few screws, so we replaced them with #10 3 inch brass screws using a yankee driver.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

There was a big hole by the bow handle, not sure if it was for a drain plug, but it looks drain plug size. So I went looking for a drain plug and found one in the parts bin.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

Drilled two pilot holes and installed #8 stainless screws.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

If you need to order reproduction handrails for a Sailfish or Super Sailfish, check out our Sales page.

Fair Winds,
Kent

Sunfish Work Cradle and Sawhorses

We rebuilt the sawhorses that came with Zip using cedar, pine and cypress. They were on their last legs, no pun intended :)

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

We also made a cradle that would hold the sawhorses and a boat, that way we can move the boat from storage to work area to garage as needed.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

From Small Boat Restoration 2013